WOW HD NL
Alle producten
  • Alle producten
  • Upc/Cat
  • Movies/TV
  • Acteur
  • Studio
  • Titel
  • Music
  • Album
  • Kunstenaar
  • Artiest (alleen Lp)
  • Label
  • Song
  • Classical
  • Album
  • Persoon
  • Werk
  • Video Games
  • Studio
  • Titel
GRATIS verzending op alles!

Verkennen

In Stock

Kunstenaars

Acteurs

Formaat

Genre

Gewaardeerd

Label

Specialiteit

Decades

Verkennen

In Stock

Kunstenaars

Acteurs

Formaat

Genre

Gewaardeerd

Studio

Specialiteit

Decades

Kleur

Verkennen

In Stock

Kunstenaars

Acteurs

Formaat

Genre

Gewaardeerd

Label

Specialiteit

Decades

Darn Tootin' at Balahissar PT. 1

Darn Tootin' at Balahissar PT. 1

(Duplicated CD)
  • Door Orchestra Naïf
  • Release 30-8-2011
  • Muziekgenre International
  • Media-indeling CD
Share Twitter
CD 
Prijs: € 11,60

Product notities

Orchestra Naïf: BioMusicographies, from "Interview the Artists" -=-=--=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= JOEL: From the beginning, I couldn't help it: lying fevered beneath a slow ceiling fan in Delhi, dozing to rags, ragtime and Ravel. JHAFFUR: I was born to the sound of the whistling thrush and the wind in the Himalayan cedars at 2100 meters in the hill station of Mussoorie in India. JOEL: We met in 1965, in Delhi, in the 5th grade chum. I quickly realized that Jhaffur made mirth, too. JHAFFUR: I grew up dancing the bhangra with wild abandon, entranced by the sound of bicycle spokes, the raga of crows at dusk, and the antiphonal monsoon symphony of dogs and night watchmen - JOEL: Jhaffur's a guy who hears everything and returns the favor. He plays fully and always has. In Delhi we'd while away weekends with instruments and noisemakers we'd find around his house. JHAFFUR: the clanging of temple bells, the trance of qawali, lilting hymns in Punjabi and the anguished cry of running quails. JOEL: People would leave sitars, flutes, guitars around for us to do-dad with (Jhaffur's dad, Ernie, welcomed a huge variety of transients to crash there). Ash trays and lamps gave as good as they got; we even found a heavy-gauge, tube-fired reel-to-reel tape recorder. JHAFFUR: The world as the ear of lived sound without boundaries was then layered with the structured tones of popular Hindi film music, rock and roll, blues, Nepali folk tunes, jazz, ghazals, Hindustani classical, and early twelve tone composers. JOEL: We fooled with one of the hemisphere's first Philips cassette recorders. Technology, you should know, collapsed (and still collapses) before music and poetry. It bows, it bow-wows; it sacrifices itself to the genuine articles, eventually. JHAFFUR: I grew up immersed in sacred music (English, Hindusthani and Punjabi) that seemed to seep seamlessly out of buildings into the babble of vegetable markets and the cacophony of crowded Delhi Streets. JOEL: True music gathers rather than safeguards. So we improvised. India is rife with a full spectrum of sights, smells and sounds. Street sounds with obvious, loveable purpose: musicians for hire, sellers of fruit, birds and monkey on the make. JHAFFUR: I took up organized percussion at age 10 and in the same year began a musical partnership with Joel - with whom I continue to record as the core duo of Orchestra naiF. JOEL: Everybody's Bollywood radio, everybody's wedding party; everybody's devotional hyms, rich and all within earshot! JHAFFUR: We formed the Guava Jamn - a rock and roll group that played at schools, beat contests and bizarre balls of luxury hotels and United Nations ladies clubs. JOEL: We waded through covers and finessed our way through extended, brazen improvisations. Jhaff hovered between bhangra, Elvin Jones and Charlie Watts. He played a bamboo flute solo on "Good Golly Miss Molly." I picked All-India Radio on my wah-wah pedal. JHAFFUR: Later, my playing modulated into a freely flowing, impressionist, narrative style with guitarist and painter, Rupak Roy and the larger 'Indian Avant Garde Ensemble," including multi-instrumentalists (and also painter) Tobit Roche and Vikram Kapur and vocalist Suresh Unny. JOEL: My parents, Betty and Guy, turned me on to silly farm tunes from Ohio and the mountains of North Carolina; Western European classics, Broadway soundtracks and live, jazz standards played in hotels with Portuguese élan, by Goans. They took me to concerts: Pete Seegar, Ravi Shankar, Ali Akbar Khan, the Delhi Symphony Orchestra. They encouraged me to study guitar and piano, and to sing. JHAFFUR: Studying French with the absurdist free jazz poet Paul Haines in New Delhi inserted an important edgewise lilt into our lyrical outpourings. JOEL: I remember Haines chuckling over our writing, even the mistakes (maybe especially the mistakes) in French. Now I'm convinced they were compliments. Haines, you might remember, wrote the libretto to 'Escalator Over the Hill,' a jazz opera that featured John McLaughlin, Jack Bruce, Roswell Rudd, Don Cherry, Linda Ronstadt and a bunch of other improbable collaborators. JHAFFUR: At thirteen I began playing and later studying the bansuri (eventually training with Debu Prasad Bannerjee, Steve Gorn and the Lineated Barbet). JOEL: I listened to a lot of records with spoken-word narratives, like Grieg's Peer Gynt Suite, a pirate-stories LP with ballads and chanties; Andy Griffith's early radio riffs, and Peter and the Wolf. I listened to my mom play Chopin on the piano. She actually bought the Manfred Mann LP that had 'Doo Wa Diddy Diddy' on it for me and my brother. It also had some great blues on it: 'Smokestack Lighting,' 'Got my Mojo Working,' and the like. JHAFFUR: A degree in Ethnomusicology from Wesleyan University in the US provided the stimulus for a study of the popular modern music of Nepal with nationally adored composer, Gopal Yonjan. And the beginning of a lifelong collection of tunely ethnic instruments. JOEL: In college I retreated into headphones of Hindemith, Ravel, Bartok, Tarrega, Segovia, (his student) John Williams; Chet Atkins; Baroque recorder music, the 'Will the Circle Be Unbroken' album with Vasser Clements, Doc Watson. Several great eras of Hindustani classical and filmi music swept through me. JHAFFUR: I performed with Bulgarian keyboardist Simeon Venkoff, and the great Anglo-Indian bassist Carl Evans at Duke's Place, the Delhi Musical society and other New Delhi haunts. JOEL: I am still lost and found in variety. Then along came Cameron. CAMERON: trading ear phones in India and Indonesia while absorbing the musical expressions of prayer and worship through gamelan, dangdut and Indian classical traditions. JHAFFUR:: After a long stint in Indonesia, I've been living in the US, recording and performing with Orchestra Naïf along with Joel and (my son) Cameron. CAMERON: Grew up blasting drum beats, rock and alternative, with large doses of trans-continental metal, punk rock and hip hop across the India Ocean, JHAFFUR:: We've performed together at the Tonic Club in New York City (opening for Evan Parker, Paul Motian and Roswell Rudd and Michael Snow); the banks of the north fork of the Shenandoah and beneath copper beech trees in Ossining, New York. CAMERON: New York brought a harsher deeper sound to my mindscape, metal signs and intense faces made me play the drums harder and faster a la Slayer. Marlboro College was a time of rebirth and reincarnation. Drinking Sufi wine, and doing Bhakti with the mystic masters, while jazz-jam fusions, funk, psychadelic madness and concoctions of conscious hip hop, with some prog rock on the record player, filled both my melodic, rhythmic, and poetic appetites with substance. JOEL: I can't honestly say I knew what he or I were doing, now or then. JHAFFUR:: Orchestre naiF performs and records, as the publicity says, 'trans-genre, instantaneously composed free world music' with an essential emphasis on jubilation. CAMERON: Rocked Brattleboro Vermont with pseudo-intellectual hip hop as Mc-Matahari, and jammed all night with crazy shit all the time. Travel took me away from the drum-set frequently, so I began to beatbox for indigenous groups in Borneo and rural farmers in India. Touching whatever instruments I could to keep my hands from going numb with neglect, I gained appreciating for the more melodic elements in composition. JOEL: We all find public libraries to be among the best sources for fresh, honest discovery. And birds. And sounds with obvious, loveable purpose. CAMERON: As I get older I've become more and more obscure and con-fused in the positive sense, balancing influences from musical traditions of lesser known times, and regions of the globe such as Nias, Bihar, Suriname, Tajikstan, with the modern sounds of Latin jazz, slow organic metal, dub step, didgeridoo, drum and bass, Bhangra and analog synthesizers. JHAFFUR: We've recorded and distributed more than a dozen albums, including "Suffering at Moses," "Kettle," 'Earthlings in Ossining," "Over an Hour," and "Auf Garde." JOEL: Then there's "MadRegal," "Les Bon-Bons," Salamader," "Ikuru," "Melting Moments," and most recently, "Too Dada" and "Get Macho." a lot in the back catalog and a lot on the griddle. Decades behind us and decades ahead.

Details

Kunstenaar: Orchestra Naïf
Titel: Darn Tootin' at Balahissar PT. 1
Genre: International
Kenmerken: Duplicated CD
Releasedatum: 30-8-2011
Label: CD Baby
Media-indeling: CD
UPC: 884501586351
Dit product is een speciale bestelling

Credits