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Night of the Living Composers

Night of the Living Composers

  • Door New Music Works
  • Release 4-4-2006
  • Media-indeling CD
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Prijs: € 23,58

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REVIEW QUOTES "One of the most stalwart contemporary music groups in the nation...." San Jose Mercury DiscPick: "With a set list that includes some of the most challenging and interesting works of our young century...one of the region's greatest artistic assets....a testament to the instrumental prowess of the collective." Peter Koht, Good Times "...ear-expanding ensemble..." Richard Scheinin, San Jose Mercury "...New Music Works is about the active, engaged, enquiring mind." Scott MacClelland, Santa Cruz Metro "West coast composers at the top of their game....nontraditional approach to new classical work." Graham Haworth, Santa Cruz Sentinel INTRODUCTORY DESCRIPTION PLAYLIST BACKGROUND ON NEW MUSIC WORKS AND NIGHT OF THE LIVING COMPOSERS The double compact disc, Night of the Living Composers, by New Music Works is a collection of exciting and diverse new chamber music by nine influential and innovative composers of the West Coast and Pacific Rim. New Music Works Ensemble and an auspicious line-up of celebrated guest artists present premiere recordings by Henry Brant, Jack Body, Philip Collins, Fred Frith, Hyo-shin Na, Paul Nauert, Jon Scoville and Allen Strange, along with a stellar revival of the late of Lou Harrison's Concerto in Slendro (1959). A wide range of musical climates are created by NMW Ensemble and such renowned guest artists as conductor/composer Fred Frith, pianist Thomas Schultz, guitarist David Tanenbaum, and percussionist William Winant, CD I 1-3 LOU HARRISON, CONCERTO IN SLENDRO (1959) 10:07 Cynthia Baehr, violin; William Winant, percussion; NMW Ensemble, Philip Collins, conductor 4 PAUL NAUERT, SUBTEXT (1998) + 6:59 David Tanenbaum, guitar 5 FRED FRITH, SCREEN (from STONE, BRICK, GLASS, WOOD, WIRE) + (1968-96) 3:40 NMW Ensemble, Fred Frith, prompter 6-10 JACK BODY, TRIBUTE TO THE BLUES (2005) +* 22:19 NMW Ensemble, Philip Collins, conductor 11 HYO-SHIN NA, 3 AND PIANO (2003) 12:07 Philip Flavin, shamisen Philip Gelb, shakuhachi Shoko Hikage, koto, Thomas Schultz, piano 12-21 PHILIP COLLINS, REQUIES RANARUM (1999) + 20:58 Colleen Donovan, soprano Charles M. Bogert, narration NMW Ensemble, Philip Collins, conductor CD II 1-7 JON SCOVILLE, LES MYSTERES DU CHATEAU DU DE (2001) +* 17:28 NMW Ensemble, Philip Collins, conductor 8 ALLEN STRANGE, KING OF HANDCUFFS (Ragtime for Harry) (2000) +11:16 Brian Staufenbiel, tenor 9-11 PHILIP COLLINS, AIRS (1995-2002) 9:35 Bruce Foster, clarinet 12 FRED FRITH, LIGHT AT THE END OF THE TUNNEL (2001) + 6:14 NMW Ensemble, audio playback, Fred Frith, conductor 13 HENRY BRANT, GLOSSARY (2000)+* 31:14 Marie Bafus, soprano; NMW Ensemble, Philip Collins, conductor += premiered by New Music Works *= commissioned by New Music Works ABOUT NEW MUSIC WORKS and NIGHT OF THE LIVING COMPOSERS The music on this collection comes from repertoire performed at New Music Works concerts between 1997- 2005. Most of the works were premiered by New Music Works, and some of them commissioned by us as well. It's a "favorites list" of intended variety, with works by eight composers that showcase New Music Works Ensemble and our guest artists in an extraordinary range of contexts. Although several of the musicians featured on this recording have performed with New Music Works for 20 years or more, the eleven-piece chamber group known as New Music Works Ensemble, didn't formalize until 1997. Since that time New Music Works Ensemble has premiered 26 commissioned works by composers Henry Brant, Fred Frith, Pablo Furman, Hyo-shin Na, Amy X Neuberg, and Jon Scoville, among others. At last count, New Music Works has presented 148 different performance projects, featuring over 691 different pieces by 342 composers, with 337 world premieres. The title Night of the Living Composers has been haunting the South Bay Area music scene since 1988. Tim Bell suggested it as an alternative to Composers' Showcase, and it's been a fixture of New Music Works' seasons ever since. It seems a fitting title for the present package since a number of the pieces were premiered at Night of the Living Composers concerts. Henry Brant composed Glossary with the aid of an architectural draft of the UCSC Recital Hall's dimensions. He stationed ensembles in the four corners of the hall, and at mid-points along the walls, while soprano Marie Bafus walked the house aisles, vocalizing radiantly in "computereez." The live dopler effect of Marie's processional is evoked wonderfully in Larry Blood's recording, which mixed centralized overhead miking with stereo mikes at the front of the house. LINER NOTES ON THE MUSIC CD I CONCERTO IN SLENDRO (1961) LOU HARRISON The Concerto in Slendro was mostly composed in 1961 aboard the S.S. New York en route to Japan. It is filled with my eager anticipation of a first taste of the beauty and bustle of Asia. The title derives from the fine Indonesian theoretical term denoting any five-tone mode in which the "seconds" are roughly "major" (or large) and the "thirds" "minor" (or small). A complimentary term, "pelog," refers to the opposite kind of mode- "seconds" small and "thirds" wide. This Concerto uses two Slendro type modes only: the "Prime Pentatonic" (if you will) and it's associated "minor." These two modes are perhaps the most common and generally loved of all modes- the first is practically the "Human Song." I intended that the two modes be in correct "just intonation" on a general basis 25/24 below A440. Instrumentation of the Concerto in Slendro is for specially tuned celesta and two "tack pianos" similarly tuned, with two percussionists playing six triangles, six gongs, and four galvanized iron garbage cans (an American metal drum). In the slow movement, two keyboard players use claves and iron pipes, reverting to their keyboards in the final movement. SUBTEXT (1998) PAUL NAUERT Frequent hesitations and unpredictable shifts of color and character lend an improvisational quality to Subtext (solo guitar, 1998). The music is generally soft-spoken and lyrical, although two suddenly aggressive passages intrude, as do brief glimpses of a (fictional) jig, flamenco gestures, and other idiomatic references. These diverse musical characters are often partially submerged in the abstract discourse of the piece; they surface clearly at certain moments and are only subliminally present during others. Binding all of these musical images together is a consistent harmonic language based on a very slow-moving sequence of pitch fields, each one designed to accommodate one or more of the large chords that often punctuate phrases in the piece. SCREEN, from STONE, BRICK, GLASS, WOOD, WIRE (1968-96) FRED FRITH Stone, Brick, Glass, Wood, Wire is a series of photographs with minimal graphic additions that can be used as musical scores. Each image is accompanied by a set of instructions which the players may use as a guide. Some of these instructions are precise and involve following the 'score'. Others are more metaphorical - you can carry out the instructions without seeing the image, though the image may serve as an inspiration. You could also make up your own instructions if you wanted to. I don't have a problem with that! TRIBUTE TO THE BLUES (2004/5) JACK BODY Version for New Music Works Ensemble Although to the uninitiated, blues can sound formulaic and repetitive, in the hands of great performers the genre can express raw, deep emotion in ways that other musical styles struggle to do. These transcriptions of classic blues recordings try to recreate the individual character of three great blues musicians - Big Joe Turner, John Lee Hooker and Mary Lou Williams - as well as 'reinterpret' archival recordings made by Allan Lomax of blues and work-chants from prisons in the southern American states. 1. Big Joe's Moan 2. Prison Blues 3. John Lee's Pluck 4. Prison Worksongs 5. Mary Lou's Dream 3 AND PIANO (2003) HYO-SHIN NA A few friends and I came up with the idea of doing a concert to celebrate Yuji Takahashi's 65th birthday. Each one of us decided to play a solo piece he's written, and I realized that, as the only person without performing skills sufficient to play his music, I'd been left out. So, I decided to write a piece instead and, for this piece, no matter how many instruments are playing unison or quasi unison-like music, there's always one that plays unrelated material (as if left out). The structure of blossoms of the Japanese Anemone influenced one section: 3 small flowers on 3 short stems and 1 identical looking large flower on a longer stem. While the shakuhachi plays traditionally notated rhythms, the other 3 instruments play spacially notated music consisting of a succession of 3 individual notes followed by 1 note in unison. The shakuhachi player (the one left out here), playing unrelated material, influences the speed and character of the music played by the other musicians, without intending to or making any effort in that direction. The piece is dedicated to Mr. Takahashi. REQUIES RANARUM (1999) PHILIP COLLINS Reqiues Ranarum eulogizes eight frog species which were declared extinct in 1994. Discoglossus nigriventer, (Palestinian Painted Frog); Rana tlaloci, (Mexico); Bufo Periglenes, (Costa Rica), Rana Fischeri, (Vegas Valley, USA), and Arthroleptides dutoiti, (Kenya). Three sub-species of the Eleutherodactylus specie (Puerto Rico) are also honored, although their suspected extinction is not official. Reqiues Ranarum was composed during 1999, and premiered on February 7 of the same year, by New Music Works, with soprano, Colleen Donovan. Several movements of Reqiues Ranarum have been significantly revised subsequent to this recording, so now there are two versions of the piece. We thank Smithsonian Folkways for permission to use selected frog calls, and Charles M. Bogert's voice. Reqiues Ranarum is dedicated to Frank Foreman, whose gift to me of the Smithsonian Folkways recording of 'Sounds of North American Frogs" inspired this undertaking. CD II LES MYSTERES DU CHATEAU DU DE (2001) JON SCOVILLE One of the joys of scoring Man Ray's whimsical, enigmatic, mischievous film was spending many hours engaged with an imagination that did not seem restricted by the limitations of the camera or by the social and artistic conventions of the era. A mix of the mysterious and the playful was characteristic of all of Ray's works, and this movie is no exception. It is this tone that I have attempted to capture in composing the soundtrack. The music is dedicated to Paulo Brandão for his gracious hospitality and discerning advice while I wrote the score in his home in Rio de Janeiro. KING OFHANDCUFFS (2000) ALLEN STRANGE King of Handcuffs (Ragtime for Harry) is a continuous set of dances with texts taken from various police testimonials regarding the handcuff and jail cell escapes of Harry Houdini. After each successful escape Houdini requested that the presiding officials write a statement describing and verifying the event. In the early 1900s Houdini published a collection of the testimonials as part of a brochure he distributed to the patrons of the London Alhambra Theatre. In King of Handcuffs the tenor assumes the roles of the chief officers responsible for drafting each statement. Each has a different personality and attitude toward the feats of the legendary escapologist. Some scenarios are spoken, others are sung, while the instrumentalist provide backdrops of stylized dances and interludes. This work is part of my "Heroes" tributes to entertainers who have shaped my attitudes about art; others include Bob Wills, Les Paul, Johnny Cash, and Ray Charles. AIRS (1995/2002) PHILIP COLLINS The free rhythms of a falling Liquid Amber leaf planted the seed of this work. It is titled Airs in the plural because I wanted to express my perceptions of air movement from multiple perspectives. I was inspired by the suppleness of nature's breathing patterns, also the (imagined) sub-atomic particle bombardments. Airs is in it's third incarnation and title change. My friend Andy Connell gave the work it's first premiere in 1994, under the alias of Serendipity. James Freeman premiered the second version, Air, and his performance won the 1996 International Clarinet Society Composition Competition. Bruce Foster has eloquently championed the piece's third, and most formidable incarnation. Which among other things, includes the addition of an "s" in the title. LIGHT AT THE END OF THE TUNNEL (2001) FRED FRITH As a composer I am increasingly concerned with what happens at the edge of perception, the tricks that acoustics and memory play. Light at the End of the Tunnel refers to a rather dark postcard I received from Robert Wyatt many years ago in which he said 'Yes, there IS light at the end of the tunnel - the end where you came in!' The music repeats itself and doesn't really seem to be going anywhere, and yet there is a sad energy to it, and maybe something is happening if we could only figure out what it is.... GLOSSARY, a Spatial Cantata (2000) HENRY BRANT A Rhetorical Setting of Computer Terms for mezzo-soprano solo with 12 instrumentalists Computer terminology, in the final years of the Second Millennium, still exists more in print than in actual conversation. What would computer terms be like if sung? I attempt to explore this idea in Glossary. There are other unusual features in the piece, and these will become apparent as the music proceeds. To say any more here would be to give up one of the main advantages of a first performance, the element of surprise. Anyway, here are a few hints: The conductor does not beat time at any point. The performers, including the singer, execute exactly what their music indicates, but never attempt to co-ordinate rhythmically. However, there is no improvisation, everything is notated in full. Glossary was commissioned through American Composers Forum as part of the Continental Harmony Program. Continental Harmony links communities with composers to celebrate the new millennium through the creation of original musical works. The program is a partnership of American Composers Forum and the National Endowment for the Arts, with additional funds provided by the John S. & James L. Knight Foundation, Rockefeller Foundation, William & Flora Hewlett Foundation, and Land O'Lakes Foundation. Continental Harmony is an Associate Partner of the White House Millennium Council. PERFORMER LIST AND TRACKS FEATURING THEM NEW MUSIC WORKS ENSEMBLE flutes, piccolo TERESA OROZCO PETERESEN (I: 6, 12 II: 1, 8, 12, 13) clarinet, bass clarinet BRUCE FOSTER (II: 9) clarinet JAMES FREEMAN (I: 12) clarinet, bass clarinet MATT INGALLS (I: 6 II: 1, 8, 12, 13) saxophones WILLIAM TRIMBLE (I: 5, 6, 12 II: 1, 12, 13) harp JENNIFER CASS (I: 5, 12 II: 12, 13) keyboards MICHAEL MCGUSHIN (I: 1, 5, 6, 12 II: 1, 12, 13) mandolin, concertina, cello, tack piano IRENE HERRMANN (I: 1, 5, 12 II: 1, 12, 13) percussion JIM KASSIS (I: 1, 5, 6 II: 8, 12, 13) percussion KENNETH PIASCIK (I: 12) percussion WARD SPANGLER (I: 6 II: 1, 8, 13) violin CYNTHIA BAEHR (I: 1, 12 II: 1, 8, 12, 13) violin TIMB HARRIS (I: 6 II: 13) cello KAREN ANDRIE (I: 5, 12) cello ARIA DI SALVIO (II: 1, 8, 12, 13) double bass STAN POPLIN (I: 5, 6, 12 II: 1, 12, 13) artistic director, conductor PHILIP COLLINS (I: 1, 6, 12 II: 1, 8, 13) GUEST ARTISTS SOLOISTS Soprano MARIE BAFUS (II: 13) Soprano COLLEEN DONOVAN (I: 12) Shamisen PHILIP FLAVIN (I: 11) guest conductor FRED FRITH (I: 5 11: 12) shakuhachi PHILIP GELB (I: 11) koto SHOKO HIKAGE (I: 11) piano THOMAS SCHULTZ (I: 11) guitar DAVID TANENBAUM (I: 4) ENSEMBLE flute MARIAN CONCUS (I: 5) clarinet JEFF GALLAGHER (I: 5) trombone CHARLES MACDOWELL (I: 6) accordion ROB REICH (I: 6) harmonium AMY C. BEAL (II: 13) celesta JOSEPHINE GANDOLFI (I: 1) violin KATE STENBERG (I: 5) violin CHARMIAN STEWART (I: 6) viola CHAD KALTINGER (I: 6) viola ELLEN RUTH ROSE (I: 6 II: 13) cello PETER GELFAND (I: 6) percussion WILLIAM WINANT (I: 1) COMPOSER AND PERFORMER BIOS COMPOSER BIOS Jack Body (born in 1944) studied at Auckland University, in Cologne and at the Institute of Sonology, Utrecht. Since 1980 he has lectured at the School of Music, Victoria University of Wellington. His music covers most genres, including chamber music, orchestral music, music-theatre, dance and film music, and electroacoustic music. He has also worked in experimental photography and computer-controlled sound-image installations. A fascination with the music and cultures of Asia, particularly Indonesia, has been a strong influence on his music. As an ethnomusicologist his published recordings include music from Indonesia and China. He has been commissioned by the NZ String Quartet, the NZ Symphony Orchestra, and music ensembles around the world, including three works for the Kronos Quartet. He is the editor of Waiteata Music Press, which publishes scores of New Zealand music, and has produced over eighteen CDs of music by New Zealand composers. Henry Brant is America's foremost composer of acoustic spatial music. The planned positioning of performers throughout the hall, as well as on stage, is an essential factor in his composing scheme and a point of departure for a radically expanded range and intensity of musical expression. Brant's spatial works, numbering over 100. have been widely performed and recorded in the U.S. and Europe, and his long career has been recognized by numerous awards and honors, including the 2002 Pulitzer Prize in Music for Ice Field (2001), the Prix Italia, the American Music Center's Letter of Distinction, and election to the American Academy of Arts and Letters. In 1998, the Paul Sacher Foundation in Basel acquired his complete archive of original manuscripts, and he received an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degree from Wesleyan University. Born in Montreal of American parents in 1913, Brant began composing at the age of eight. In the late 1940's, he taught both at Columbia University and Juilliard. From 1957-1980, he taught composition at Bennington College. Since 1981, he has made his home in Santa Barbara, California. Fred Frith, As song-writer, composer, improviser and multi-instrumentalist, Fred Frith's work defines an area of music-making on the border between rock, contemporary music, and improvisation. Co-founder of the British band Henry Cow in 1968, he moved to New York ten years later and became associated with the so-called "downtown scene" as an associate of John Zorn, Bob Ostertag, and Lesli Dalaba. In New York he was instigator of the groups Massacre, Skeleton Crew, and Keep the Dog (a six-piece band re-inventing 20 years' worth of his compositions). Fred is currently active in Massacre, Maybe Monday (with Larry Ochs and Miya Masaoka), and Normal (with Sudhu Tewari on home-made contraptions). He also composes extensively for film (Rivers and Tides, The Tango Lesson, Thirst) and dance, as well as for groups like the Arditti Quartet, Ensemble Modern, and ROVA Sax Quartet. His nomadic encounters are the subject of Werner Penzel and Nicolas Humbert's award-winning film Step Across the Border. He is currently Professor of Composition at Mills College in Oakland, California. Lou Harrison, composer (1917-2003) For fifty years, Lou Harrison was in the vanguard of American composers. An innovator of musical composition and performance that transcended cultural boundaries, Harrison's highly acclaimed work juxtaposes and synthesizes musical dialects from virtually every corner of the world. Lou was born in Portland, Oregon, and raised in the culturally diverse San Francisco Bay Area, where he was influenced by Cantonese Opera, Gregorian chants and the music of California's Spanish and Mexican cultures. As a young man, Lou worked as a dancer and a dance accompanist, while studying composition and World Music with Henry Cowell. Lou met John Cage through Cowell and the two students created a wealth of percussion music that freely mingled junkyard-items with percussion instruments indigenous of Asia, Africa and the Americas. In 1941 Lou began a year of study with Arnold Schoenberg in Los Angeles, followed by nearly a decade in New York, during which time he wrote music reviews for the Herald Tribune under the editorship of Virgil Thomson. In addition to reviewing, Lou composed prolifically, built instruments, and continued his editing of Charles Ives' music, a responsibility of Harrison's since 1935, when Ives sent him box loads of scores. In 1946 Lou conducted the premiere of Ives' Third Symphony, which won the composer a Pulitzer Prize. Lou returned to the West Coast in 1953, to a cabin in the mountains of Aptos, California. During his 50 years in Aptos, Lou composed 138 works, many that reflect his deep fondness for Asian cultures and tunings. Hyo-shin Na. As a two-time recipient of the Korean National Composers Prize (1994, 2003), Hyo-shin Na has had her music performed world-wide; at festivals and concert series in her native country as well as throughout Europe, North America, Africa and the rest of Asia. Na has recently been awarded commissions by the Koussevitzky Foundation, the Fromm Foundation at Harvard, and the National Center for Korean Traditional Performing Arts. Works have been premiered by the San José Chamber Orchestra, San Francisco Contemporary Players, Earplay, Seoul Traditional Orchestra, Ives String Quartet, Del Sol String Quartet, New Music Works, Contemporary Music Ensemble Korea, among others. Her music has been recorded on the Fontec, Top Arts, and Seoul labels and is published in Korea and Australia. She is the author of "Conversations with Kayageum Master Byung-ki Hwang." Paul Nauert holds degrees from the Eastman School of Music, where he was awarded the McCurdy Prize in Composition, and Columbia University, where he earned his PhD in music theory in 1997. His principle composition teachers include Samuel Adler, Joseph Schwantner, Robert Morris, and Fred Lerdahl. His music has received several honors including awards from the Music Teachers National Association, The Guild of Temple Musicians, and BMI. The Peabody Trio and The New Millenium Ensemble-both recipients of the Naumberg Award for chamber music-have offered recent performances of his work. Dr. Nauert is currently Assistant Professor in the Music Department at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He teaches composition and theory, performs as a pianist, and publishes research on a variety of topics, including temporal structure in twentieth century music and computer models of music composition and cognition. Jon Scoville, was raised in Connecticut, ruined in New York, and restored in California. He is the resident music director and composer for Tandy Beal & Company and is on the faculty of the University of Utah. He has taught workshops and accompanied dance classes in Europe, Asia, South America and throughout the United States. His sound installations have been heard in Tokyo, São Paulo, Santa Cruz, and Salt Lake City. Scores for choreographers include works for Alwin Nikolais, Murray Louis, Laura Dean, Sara Rudner and the Oakland Ballet. He is the recipient of grants from the California Arts Commission, Meet the Composer/West, and the Utah Arts Council. He is co-author of Sound Designs.If he hadn't met his latest wife Tandy 43 years ago, he'd be playing guitar in a country and western band in Nashville and voting Republican. Allen Strange, composer and performer (b. 1943), studied composition with Donal Michalsky at State University, Fullerton, and later with Robert Erickson, Harry Partch, Ken Gaburo and Pauline Oliveros at the University of California, San Diego. Strange is one of the leading authorities on analogue electronic music; his Electronic Music: Systems, Techniques, and Controls (1972) is now a classic text. He also wrote Programming and Meta-Programming the Electro-Organism (1974), the operations manual for the Buchla Music Easel. He co-founded two performance groups, Biome (1967-72) with Buchla, and in 1974, the Electronic Weasel Ensemble. He has appeared as a guest artist-lecturer throughout the world. With his wife, Patricia, they have recently published The Contemporary Violin: Extended Performance Techniques. Strange composes for live electronic instrumental ensembles, for live and taped electronics with voices and acoustic instruments, and for the theatre. He is particularly interested in linear tuning systems, spatial distribution of sound. Elements of vaudeville, rock-and-roll, country-and-western music, and the guitar techniques of Les Paul are found in his works. Strange lives on Bainbridge Island in the Puget Sound pursuing a full-time career composing and concertizing with his wife. GUEST ARTISTS Marie Bafus, mezzo-soprano has performed with opera companies and concert presenters throughout the west coast and abroad. In 2000 she performed David Garner's Seven Nocturnal Heptastisches, and was a guest artist with New Music Works where she premiered Henry Brant's Glossary with New Music Works in Santa Cruz. Colleen Donovan, soprano, has a private voice studio in San Francisco and is particularly interested in new and Indonesian music. She is a former member of Gamelan Sekar Asih and Pusaka Sunda Gamelan Degung. She performed regularly with New Music Works throughout the 1990s. Philip Flavin, shamisen, received a degree in International Relations and Japanese from the University of the Pacific and studied sankyoku music at the Seiha Conservatory of Japanese Music in Tokyo. He received a doctorate from UC Berkeley; lives and teaches in the Bay Area. Josephine Gandolfi, celesta, has been performing in the Bay Area since 1978 as a soloist, chamber player, and accompanist. She has performed throughout the United States and abroad, and has served as keyboardist for the Cabrillo Music Festival and other ensembles. Josephine is a member of the piano faculties at Stanford and UCSC. Recordings include music by Lou Harrison, Henry Cowell, Michael Gandolfi, and others. Philip Gelb, shakuhachi, is one of the most active shakuhachi performers and teachers in North America. He runs the Bay Area Shakuhachi School, and has premiered pieces by Pauline Oliveros, Chris Brown, and others. Philip studied shakuhachi with Dale Olsen, Ronnie Seldin, and he currently studies with Yoshio Kurahashi. Peter Gelfand, cellist, serves as Principal Cellist with the San Jose Symphony and the Monterey County Symphony. He formerly played with the St. Louis Symphony, an orchestra with which he toured and recorded extensively. Mr. Gelfand received his undergraduate and graduate degrees at the Indiana University School of Music, where he studied with cellist Janos Starker. Shoko Hikage, koto, began playing koto at the age of three in Japan. Her first instructor was Chizuga Kimura. In 1992, Shoko gave her first American solo recital, at the 'New Music Across America' Series in Hawaii. In 1997, she moved to San Francisco, where she performs regularly as a soloist and in collaboration with a range of artists. Thomas Schultz, piano is a highly regarded as an interpreter of music from earlier eras as well as of our own time. He has worked with Cage, Feldman, Wolff, Carter, and Korean composer Hyo-shin Na, among others. He has performed throughout Europe, Asia, and the U.S.. He has been a member of the piano faculty at Stanford University since 1994. Brian Staufenbiel, tenor, director, has performed in oratorios, operas, and solo recitals throughout the United States and Canada. He has recorded for Musical Heritage Society, Koch International Classics, and Helicon Records. He is currently on the faculty at the University of California, Santa Cruz, where he teaches voice and directs the opera program. David Tanenbaum, Guitar, is considered one of the most gifted guitarists of his generation and an eloquent proponent of new guitar repertoire. Works have been composed for him by Hans Werner Henze, Terry Riley, Lou Harrison, and Pulitzer Prize winner Aaron Jay Kernis. To name but a few. Tanenbaum has collaborated with a wide range of artists including, the Kronos, Shanghai, Alexander and Chester String Quartets, dancer Tandy Beal and guitarist Manuel Barrueco. He is currently Chairman of the Guitar Department at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music. William Winant, Percussion. Described as 'one of the best avant-garde percussionists working today' by Mark Swed of the Los Angeles Times, William has collaborated with such innovative musicians as Cage, Xenakis, Keith Jarrett, and the Kronos String Quartet. He has made over 100 recordings and has appeared as percussion soloist with major orchestras throughout the world. He teaches at UC Berkeley, UC Santa Cruz, and is an Artist-In-Residence at Mills College. NMW ENSEMBLE & FRIENDS Marian Concus, flute, is a member of Fremont Symphony and Santa Cruz County Symphony, and served as solo piccoloist with the Boise Philharmonic.. She has recorded with with Adama in Paris, the Maxwell Street Klezmer Band, Laudamus Choir and the Ohlone Chamber Singers. She is a graduate of the New England Conservatory of Music. Teresa Orozco-Petersen, flute, received her BA/MA from San Jose State University with honors, and is a member of the Monterey Symphony. Teresa is also an accomplished jazz and Latin music performer, a member of the salsa band Mambo Tropical and co-conductor of the San Jose Youth Symphony Flute Choir. She has performed with New Music Works since 1997. Bruce Foster, Clarinet, currently performs with New Music Works and The West Bay Opera. He teaches at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, S.F. University High School and the University of Notre Dame. His principle clarinet teachers were Mark Brandenburg and Rosario Mazzeo. James Freeman, clarinet, is a former member of the wind quintet, Quintessence, and a founding member of both City Winds. And New Music Works Ensemble . He is the winner of 1996 International Clarinet Association, for his performance of Philip Collins' Air Mr. Freeman is on the faculty of the S.F. Conservatory of Music. Matt Ingalls, clarinets, is a composer, clarinetist, improviser, computer music programmer, and concert producer. Active in the Bay Area creative music community, he is mostly known for his 'composerly' solo improvisations with clarinet and/or electronics. Matt is the instigator of the sfSoundGroup, a contemporary music ensemble made up of similarly interested composer-performers. Jeff Gallagher, clarinet, completed his undergraduate work at the Ohio State University and did his graduate study at Bowling Green State University. A resident of Santa Cruz since 1990, he has performed with a wide variety of ensembles including New Music Works; the Carmel Bach Festival; The Santa Cruz Chamber Players, and many others. William Trimble, saxophones, has been a guest performer with the S.F. Symphony, the Cabrillo Music Festival, and other orchestras. He has performed with New Music Works since 1992. William's recordings can be heard on the Musical Heritage Society and Gnorble Music. Lou Harrison, Jon Scoville, Manly Romero, Daniel Wyman and Allen Strange, and countless others have composed works for William. Charlie McDowell, trombone. Since arriving in Santa Cruz in 1985, Charlie McDowell has performed with a wide assortment of local musical ensembles and continues to do so. The list includes, the UCSC Orchestra, the Antiquarian Funks, New Music Works, Shakespeare Santa Cruz., and others Amy C. Beal, harmonium, teaches music history and twentieth-century performance practice at UCSC. As a musicologist her research focuses on American experimental music after 1950 and the cultural history of postwar West Germany. Originally trained as a classical pianist, Beal now remains active as an occasional performer in local contemporary and non-western ensembles. Rob Reich, accordion, also composes, arranges and plays piano. Since studying composition at Oberlin Conservatory, he has worked with many accomplished musicians. He currently plays gypsy jazz with Gaucho, Klezmer music with Kugelplex and The Red Hot Chachkas.. He is also the bandleader for Rococo Risque cabaret. Jennifer Cass, harp, holds Master's degrees in both music and mathematics. She has performed with UCSC faculty and ensembles, New Music Works, Santa Cruz Chamber Players, Bay Shore Lyric Opera, Cabrillo Stage, and Ensemble Monterey and is an occasional harpist for the local symphonies. Jennifer teaches mathematics at Cabrillo College in her spare time. Irene Herrmann, concertina, mandolin, cello, and percussion, has been performing with New Music Works for fifteen years. She is an active chamber music performer and presently accompanies choirs at both UC Santa Cruz and Cabrillo College. Her major field of interest is chamber music and piano literature of the 20th century, and she worked extensively with the late composer/writer Paul Bowles. Michael McGushin, keyboard, is a professor of music theory at Cabrillo College in Aptos, and is well known in the Santa Cruz area as a pianist, composer, and conductor. He regularly accompanies the UCSC Chamber Singers and choral groups at Cabrillo College, and directs the Westside Folk and Gospel Choir. Michael has performed regularly with New Music Works since 1985. Jim Kassis, percussion. Since moving to the San Francisco Bay Area in 1987 to study with San Francisco Symphony percussionist Anthony Cirone, Jim has been teaching and performing both drum set and classical percussion throughout northern California. Jim serves on the faculty at Santa Clara University and the Community School of Music and Arts in Mountain View. He has played with New Music Works Ensemble since 2002. Kenneth Piascik, percussion, received his Doctorate of Musical Arts from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He holds a Bachelor of Music degree from William Paterson University where he remains an active member of the New Jersey Percussion Ensemble. In addition to Dr. Piascik's extensive performance experience, he has remained active as an educator and conductor Ward Spangler, percussion, is principal percussionist with the Berkeley, East Bay, and Fremont Symphonies, as well as a member of the Marin Symphony, the Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music. In 2001, he premiered David Shienfeld's Different Worlds of Sound, a percussion concerto composed for him, and in 2002 he premiered Unsuk Chin's Allegro ma non troppo for solo percussion and electronics in Berlin and Ojai. Cynthia Baehr, violin, is Concertmaster for Opera San Jose and the San Jose Chamber Orchestra, as well as a member of New Music Works Ensemble. She has performed with the finest orchestras of the West Coast, and prior to moving to California, she lived and performed in Europe with the Lucerne Chamber Soloists and the Wurttembergisches Chamber Orchestra in Germany. Timb Harris, violin, is the violinist and trumpeter for Estradasphere and Secret Chiefs 3, which can be seen performing both across the United States and internationally. His recordings can be found on Tzadik, Mimicry Recordings, and others. The New Music Works family has become one of his favorite parties to crash over the years.... . Kate Stenberg, violin, is a member of the Award-winning Del Sol String Quartet, and has played with the S.F. Symphony, the S.F. Contemporary Music Players, and at the Other Minds Festival. She is a graduate of the S.F. Conservatory and received her Master's Degree from Eastman School of Music. Charmian Stewart, violinist, started playing Suzuki violin at the age of four, and later studied music at Oberlin Conservatory and then the Cleveland Institute of Music. Since moving to the Bay Area, she has played with the San Jose Symphony, New Century Chamber Orchestra, Fresno Philharmonic, the Monterey County Symphony and the Cabrillo Music Festival. Chad Kaltinger, viola. Studied with Emanuel Vardi at the University of Illinois and with Heidi Castleman at the Aspen Music Festival where he received an Orchestral Fellowship and placed 1st in the E. Nakamichi Viola Concerto Competition. Chad is currently Principal Violist with the Santa Cruz County Symphony, the Musica Vitale Chamber Orchestra and other groups. Ellen Ruth Rose, viola, has championed experimental contemporary music in the Bay Area and abroad, premiering countless works, performing, and recording extensively as a chamber musician and soloist. She has received degrees from both Harvard and Juilliard and teaches viola and chamber music at UC Davis and UC Berkeley. Karen Andrie, cello, received a Bachelor degree and Performer's Certificate from Eastman School of Music. She has won numerous awards and has toured with the Atlanta and Columbus string quartets as well as Trio d'Accordo. She performed with New Music Works 1992-2003. Presently, Ms. Andrie performs and teaches in the Greater Bay Area, and is lecturer in cello at UCSC. Aria Di Salvio, cello, has performed at the Monterey and Big Sur Jazz Festivals, and with the University of Michigan Creative Arts Orchestra at the Montreux-Detroit Jazz Festival. Currently, Ms. Di Salvio performs with New Music Works Ensemble (since 2003), and is a freelance cellist, conductor, and teacher in Santa Cruz. Stan Poplin, bass, is a founding member of New Music Works Ensemble, and has played with the Cabrillo Music Festival and other ensembles. In 1990 he began a five-year period in Oslo, where he studied, recorded and toured throughout Norway. Mr. Poplin has made many recordings of jazz and blues as well as classical music. Philip Collins - Artistic Director, conductor and composer Philip Collins co-founded New Music Works (NMW) in 1979 and has served as the organization's Artistic Director and Conductor since 1982. His diversified interests and experience as a composer, performer and teacher have cultivated a wide range of collaborative relationshipswith musicians and artists of varied disciplines and styles. Collins has conducted and performed in over 90 programs for NMW since 1982. Collins has guest-conducted concerts with the San José Chamber Orchestra, and the Cabrillo Music Festival, among others. He was Guest Lecturer and Conductor for the Lou Harrison Festival at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music (1997), and has been Artist in Resident at Cabrillo Music Festival, Vassar College (Martha Farmer Fellowship), and the IDRIART Festival. Composing began in the early teens and formal training in college with John Krueger (Canada College), Henry Onderdonk (S.F. State) and Edwin Dugger. In 1976, upon moving to Santa Cruz, Collins met Lou Harrison; befriended him, worked as his copyist and assistant, and studied composition with him. Collins has presented performances of Harrison's music on an annual basis since 1978. Collins' music has been performed throughout the U.S. and Canada, and has garnered prizes including First Prize, International Clarinet Society Composition Competition, 1996 (Airs); The Gail Rich Award 1996; First Prize,1994 L'ARCIM Festival in Montreal (Sappho Songs),; and Dramalogue Award for Best Musical Direction (1987). Collins teaches World Music and classical guitar at Cabrillo and Hartnell Colleges.

Details

Titel: Night of the Living Composers
Releasedatum: 4-4-2006
Label: CD Baby
Media-indeling: CD
UPC: 837101128353
Objectnummer: CDBY112835