WOW HD NL
Alle producten
  • Alle producten
  • Upc/Cat
  • Movies/TV
  • Acteur
  • Studio
  • Titel
  • Music
  • Album
  • Kunstenaar
  • Artiest (alleen Lp)
  • Label
  • Song
  • Classical
  • Album
  • Persoon
  • Werk
  • Video Games
  • Studio
  • Titel
GRATIS verzending op alles!

Verkennen

In Stock

Kunstenaars

Acteurs

Formaat

Genre

Gewaardeerd

Label

Specialiteit

Decades

Verkennen

In Stock

Kunstenaars

Acteurs

Formaat

Genre

Gewaardeerd

Studio

Specialiteit

Decades

Kleur

Verkennen

In Stock

Kunstenaars

Acteurs

Formaat

Genre

Gewaardeerd

Label

Specialiteit

Decades

Meditations with Torrey Hall/ Classics & Hymns for

Meditations with Torrey Hall/ Classics & Hymns for

  • Door Torrey Hall
  • Release 9-8-2011
  • Media-indeling CD
Share Twitter
CD 
Prijs: € 18,97

Product notities

TRACK ONE Clair de Lune is the third movement of Debussy's Suite bergamasque or collection of dances, written in 1890 and published in 1905. It's meaning is "moonlight", though Debussy originally titled it Promenade Sentimentale. Paul Verlaine's poetry, namely "Poems saturniens" influenced the creative process of Debussy in the composition's revision and name change. With vivid colors Mr. Hall recreates with a dazzling display of artistry, the shimmering reflective qualities of orange moonlight cascading through night-time clouds against a backdrop of blackened outer-space, exuding a dreamy and ethereal effect. The light touch and full round tones are reminiscent of Horowitz. TRACK TWO In 1827 Franz Schubert wrote the Opus 90 series of Impromptus, and here for us now, Mr. Hall performs the Opus 90 Number 3 in G flat major. The work is viewed as a variations on a theme, written in a pattern utilized by Beethoven in structure and form. The strong and compelling melody line ushers the listener through a series of ornamental passageways and finally resolving the journey on the other side. Again, the artist displays a commanding gentleness of touch, subtly threading the lines through the needles of structure and dynamic shadings. The colors he paints are a sheer joy to see and behold! TRACK THREE Mr. Hall performs the Andante, the second movement of Mozart's Piano Sonata No 5 K283, written in 1774 during a visit to Munich for the production of his La finta giardiniera. Performing Mozart's piano literature has often been described by artists as akin to a trapeze artist walking the high tight wire in the buff (naked), meaning, "everything shows". The literature is best played by both children, and the most mature keyboard artists. Children find the playfulness in it, and artists recreate that playfulness. All other students of the piano make it sound too much like work! Listen to the subtle use of rubato in Mr. Hall's rendition on this recording; he refuses to give-in to the tilting temptation to play in strict tempo aka metronome. Rubato is rarely used by most performing pianists, due to a lack of understanding it's use. We think Mr. Hall understands it quite well, in fact! TRACK FOUR The piano music of Franz Liszt holds the affections of classical music lovers everywhere. His later music was the result of his personal losses and grief, a creative response to crushing sorrows. CONSOLATION Number #3, is a great example, which Mr. Hall plays with great emotion and color, providing a window into the great composer's heart. Here the artist's own bond with the melancholy is exposed as well. Liszt once told a friend "I carry with me a deep sadness of the heart which must now and then break out in sound." The deaths of his children so close together (Daniel, 1859 and Blandine, 1862) accelerated the rush of heartache upon his soul, and hence, years later, the deaths of friends, colleagues, and note-worthies continued to press the darkness upon him. Desolation, despair and death seemed to be his companions in life, and thus, his work CONSOLATION Number #3, like so much of his piano literature, takes his grief to a level of high art, and in which, as has been said, "a troubled spirit seeks consolation in memories of the past." TRACK FIVE Who among us has not heard those treasured words sung by many, written down so long ago, yet which still speak to the heart! "In the sweet by and by, we shall meet on that beautiful shore." This loved Civil War era hymn, was the result of a brief conversaton which took place between the composer and the lyricist. The former was described by the latter, as having the "melancholy", and so, being his friend, he attempted to raise his spirits by challenging him to compose a new song! The musician, a violinist by the name of Webster, was standing alongside a woodstove when the conversation took place, resulting in this beloved hymn. Bennett, the lyricist (1836 - 1898) asked him "Webster, what is the matter now?!", to which the musician answered dryly "no matter", then adding quietly "it will be alright by and by.........."; His comment brought a flash of sunlight to Bennett's mind, who replied "the sweet by and by......."; and it was at that point, that Bennett penned the words, handing them to the musician moments later to read himself. The violinist picked up his instrument and immediately began playing a melody to the words his friend had just written. Thus, in the space of a half-hour, this hymn tune, which has found it's place in American folk music, raised to a higher prominence than that of Stephen Foster, was born! Mr. Hall plays this using nothing but two fingers, one on each hand, the result of his own musical genius! This hymn, like the others on the album, is solely Mr. Hall's own arrangement, and is played as simply as possible, so as to not distract from the message of the hymn. If this doesn't reach your soul, nothing will. TRACK SIX This Nocturne was written by the French composer Francis Poulenc (1899 - 1963), who was without doubt, the most recent composer whose music is performed by Mr. Hall. The term "nocturne", from the Latin "nocturnus", refers to a musical composition that is inspired and redolent of the night. The great Polish composer Chopin wrote many nocturnes, and perhaps, almost without question, it seems to be a characteristic of both composers and musicians, to be "night owls". It is no secret that Poulenc's personal life was a paradox, full of conflicts and contradictions. Raised in the Roman Catholic Church, he attempted to walk the fence between homosexuality and doctrinal orthodoxy, which flew in the face of his scriptural and theological injunctions. It would appear he chose the former over the latter, if his comment to a friend was taken literally: 'You know that I am as sincere in my faith, without any messianic screamings, as I am in my Parisian sexuality.' (At one point, Poulenc planned to marry a young woman by the name of Raymonde Linossier, but whose sudden death removed all possibilities). Though he never acknowledged it publically, it is believed that he fathered a daughter (Marie-Ange), whose mother ('Freddy') was the dedicatee of two of his works. Nocturne Number #1, performed by Hall, is deceptive in it's simpleness of harmony and melody line, as it requires a certain keyboard technical prowess not possessed by amateur pianists or students. The work includes hair-pin turns for the driver (pianist), without slowing down (maintaining the same speed rounding the corners as driving along the straight stretches). Mr. Hall plays this nocturne at a brisk but steady pace of tempo, holding the melody line in high relief, while shading abrupt passages dynamically aka pianissimos and fortes. As with most of Poulenc's piano literature, this Nocturne Number #1 requires the pianist to have a master's control over finger movement and weight, resulting in quick turns without smearing the colors in this beautiful musical painting. TRACK SEVEN Written in 1929 (published in '32) by Albert Brumley, the song I'LL FLY AWAY was in part, the result of influences (as with other hymn tunes) by an earlier secular ballad. This song holds the bragging rights to 'the most recorded gospel song', and is sung by millions, crossing denominational lines but all within the boundaries of Christiandom. The tune has become part of American folk music, and is often performed or sung at bluegrass music events, and of course, many funerals, given it's message of hope beyond the grave. The whole idea for the song came to the composer, while working on his father's cotton farm in Oklahoma one day. To help pass the hours of work, he began singing the words to a popular ballad.....'if I had the wings of an angel, over these prison walls I would fly.....'; It immediately came to him that the seed for growing a great musical crop (gospel song) was found, and he would plant it! It was three years later, that the song was completed, with a paraphrased version of the popular ballad's words '...like a bird from prison bars has flown....', which seemed to be what Brumley wanted to express, namely that earthly life can seem as living within the walls of a prison. After the song went viral, Brumley said '....when I wrote it, I had no idea that it would become so universally popular.' Mr. Hall's arrangement is nothing short of genius (as with his other hymn arrangements on the album). He keeps it simple, using intervals of fourths and fifths to augment the sonorous beauty of the melodic line, and to keep the message clear and up front. The result will find you humming along, tapping the foot, and feeling the warmth of the sunshine in your soul! TRACK EIGHT The composer of the music to REVIVE US AGAIN (John Husband) and the lyricist who wrote the words (William Mackay) never knew each other, and for good reason! Husband lived from 1760 - 1825, while Mackay's life spanned the years 1839 - 1885. It is not known how the collaboration came together, the words put to the melody written so long before. The story, however, is worth telling here. Dr. Mackay had a mother who feared God and prayed for her son many years. In his own words (later) he said '...many times I saw her on bended knee in prayer for my soul's salvation..' He continued on, saying 'nothing made a deep impression upon me', and told of his ever-increasing wickedness over the subsequent years. However, the day finally arrived, when he as a medical doctor, met his mother's prayers head-on. A seriously injured man was brought to the hospital where he worked, and over several days time, it became obvious that he would not survive the accident (not explained). The patient asked Dr. Mackay how long he expected him to live, and the doctor told him, asking him if there were relatives he could contact accordingly, to which the dying man shook his head. His only wish, was to see his land-lady who held for him his copy of 'the book'. Mackay was struck by the man's joyous countenance, given his imminent death at hand. Days passed without notice, and soon enough, the man died, leaving some personal items behind. The nurse held up a book to the doctor, and asked 'what shall we do with this?' Dr. Mackay asked 'what is it?', to which she replied 'it's the Bible of the poor man who just died', handing it to him. Dr. Mackay took the Bible, and, was shocked to realize it was the Bible that his own mother had inscribed and given to him years before, of which he had carelessly sold when in need of quick cash! This Bible had ushered the poor dying man into his heavenly home with great joy! And now, it was back in the hands of the one it was intended for years before, by a loving and praying mother! Needless to say, the doctor's life was transformed from that moment forward. A mother's prayers had finally been answered! 'Wilt thou not revive us again: that thy people may rejoice in thee? Shew us they mercy, O LORD, and grant us thy salvation.' Psalm 85:6 TRACK NINE Taken from the WELL TEMPERED CLAVIER, Bach's PRELUDE IN C MAJOR, BWV 846 is well known to audiences all over the world. It is often performed at weddings, given it's liturgical nature, as with many of his works, choral and otherwise. As with many today, Bach is often (and wrongly) viewed as having lived with all classical composers during one period in time and history. Not true. He was before the time of Beethoven and Mozart! In fact, Beethoven used to practice the Well Tempered Clavier in all scales. Mozart's introduction to this book did not occur until he was 26 years of age! Schumann would play one of Bach's preludes and fugues every day, and Chopin's pedagogue (teacher) used Bach's works for his own students of the piano. During Bach's life time, there were many methods in use for tuning keyboard instuments (the piano as we know it today was not yet invented), and some scales would not rhyme (out-of-tune) as in today's modal structures. Hence, the need for the possiblity of playing all 24 scales (12 majors / 12 minors) in harmony with each other and thus, Bach's preludes and fugues for each one of them. And we are the richer for it! The term 'clavier' means keyboard, and at the time of Bach, many were in use: the harpsichord, clavichord, and the pianoforte (precursor to the modern piano). The Well Tempered Clavier was designed by Bach to be performed on any of the keyboard instruments. PRELUDE IN C MAJOR, performed here by Mr. Hall, is in fact, the introduction (prelude's meaning) to the main piece of work, and like most preludes, is not as layered (difficult) note-wise, as say, one of the fugues. That is not to say, that any pianist can make the preludes sound equal. To the contrary, the trick to playing this particular prelude, is in executing a subtle rubato with a dab of torque here and there. It takes a good ear, a good sense of rhythm, and a master's touch to bring these all in alignment with each other. Mr. Hall accomplishes it quietly and seemingly without effort. Take especial notice of his accentuations on the downbeat of each rhythmical circle, which showcases just why this pianist is rated as one of the best keyboard artists today. TRACKS TEN & ELEVEN The Gnossiennes Number #1 and #4: (the term derived from the composer himself, Eric Satie, a French Jew from whom Debussy and Ravel patterned their French Impressionistic piano literature). Those familiar with Jewish music recognize instantaneously the mournfulness in these beautiful and melodic pieces. Most Jewish music finds it's roots in religious expression and culture, going back thousands of generations to the first recorded books of what has come to be known as the Old Testament period (the goyim term 'Old Testament' is known in Judaism as the 'Tanakh', comprising of three divisions: the Torah, Nevi'i'm and Ketuvim, or rather, the Law, the Torah, and the Prophets). In the words of musicologist Velvel Pasternak, 'The importance of music in the life of the Jewish people is found almost at the beginning of Genesis... [musicians are] mentioned among the three fundamental professions.... Music was viewed as a necessity in everyday life, as a beautifying and enriching complement of human existence.' Eric Satie, the composer of the Gnossiennes came to be known as a 'minimalist' [a reductive style or school of modern music utilizing only simple sonorities, rhythms, and patterns, with minimal embellishment or orchestrational complexity, and characterized by protracted repetition of figurations, obsessive structural rigor, and often a pulsing, hypnotic effect.] The two Gnossiennes, performed here by Mr. Hall 'par excellence', catapult the listener back in time, to that of the great pharaohs of Egypt, with the ancient middle eastern flavors of color, symetry, mode and melody line. Add to that, the cultural heartbeat of the Jewish people, and you have within your possession, a musical treasure beyond price! Of course, as a musician of Jewish descent (his mother's side) Mr. Hall takes to this music like a bird to the air or a fish to the water. Here he truly shines, and one can sense his own heartbeat pulsating with identification of the composer's own heart. The ever mournful melancholy, song of sorrow always present, amidst the smiles, the rolling tears, the aching beauty of a people lost and found again, a rebirth and reminiscence all at the same time. These are buried treasures discovered! TRACK TWELVE Gymnopedie Number #1: Again, as with the Gnossiennes, the 'minimalistic' nature of the piece takes hold of the listener; the spare and bare essentials to sketch a distant scene in vivid colors of memory. This piece, unlike the Gnossiennes however, is better known to the public, and is often associated with memories lost, cherished times past, childhood scenes, nostalgic loves, nature, the autumn season, the photo-album, old pictures now worn with age, the heart-ache of good times long gone, the longing for something taken away, a wish for past friends, and so forth. Written in 3/4 time, these were the precursors to modern ambient music, and as has been stated before 'gentle yet somewhat eccentric (in nature) which when composed, defied the classical tradition.' Characteristics of this are the use of 'deliberate, but mild dissonances against the harmony, producing a piquant, melancholy effect.......'; Possible meanings (gymnopedie is a Greek term): dance, antiquity, gymnasium, warfare, and religious ceremony, amongst other credible possibilities. Mr. Hall plays this Gymnopedie Number #1 with the near preoccupation of nostalgic longings, as if musing to himself, unawares that others might be listening, too. It is with a feeling of sadness bordering on sorrow that Mr. Hall plays this lovely dance, smiling with tears in the eyes, an intimate portrait of the artist himself. TRACK THIRTEEN The American spiritual, DEEP RIVER, finds it's roots in African-American soil, back to the time of bondage and slavery, a dark time in American history. It's a prayer put to music or hymn, and tells of the hope for a better place after this life is over. The words speak for themselves: Deep River, My home is over Jordan. Deep River Lord, I want to cross over into campground. Oh, don't you want to go, To the gospel feast? That promised land, Where all is peace; Oh, Deep River, Lord I want to cross over into campground! Mr. Hall's own arrangement of this loved song, is patterned by the artist after Chopin's Prelude in E Minor, Opus 28 # 4, using the left hand chords to subtly prop up the singing melody line. Again, only a musician of Mr. Hall's caliber would think to do this for a song that is quite often, sung with gushing accompaniment. His insistence on keeping it simple, shows his absolute confidence that this background would be quite sufficent to hold the song together as a whole. We think him nothing short of musical genius, as we have never yet heard anything quite like this before, and hence, Mr. Hall gives this spiritual a classical sound, without taking away from it's utterances and cries of bondage. One can almost hear the voice-like qualities that Hall brings out, using a weighted touch in the melody, while painting with large strokes in the left hand. As with his other hymn arrangements on this album, we believe this will reach your heart and soul as nothing can. It leaves the listener wanting more! TRACK FOURTEEN WIDMUNG ('devotion'), by Schumann, written for his beloved wife, Clara Wieck, the daughter of his former teacher; Robert Schumann (1810 - 1856), a German composer, was one of the most prominent representative composers of the Romantic era. His teacher (Clara's father, Friedrich Wieck) believed the young Schumann to someday become about the finest pianist in all of Europe (a hand injury destroyed that aspiration). It was following this crushing development (injury) that Schumann turned to composition, and perhaps it was for the better, as he secured forever, his own place in history, as one of the great classical composers of the 19th century, in addition to helping to set the stage for the definition of the Romantic era of music. The more one learns of Schumann's personal life, the greater the intensity of love for his musical out-pourings; it was a known fact that the composer suffered mental anguish, and later in life, made some attempts at suicide. He sometimes heard 'voices' in his head that he tried to shut down, and finally, for the last two years of his life, at his own request, was confined to a mental institution til his death while yet in his mid-40's. Widmung is often sung by the world's great opera singers, and one of the best renditions of the song is given by the great Jesse Norman. The English translation of the song is descriptive of Robert's attempt at exposing the light and joy Clara brought into the darkness of his suffering soul: You my soul, you my heart, You my bliss, o you my pain, You the world in which I live; You my heaven, in which I float, O you my grave, into which I eternally cast my grief. You are the rest, you are the peace, You are the heaven upon me bestowed. That you love me makes me worthy of you; your gaze transfigures me; you raise me lovingly above myself, my good spirit, my better self 'Thou Art My Soul, and Thou my heart, Thou art my Joy Thou art my world for life adoring, My heav'n art thou where in I'm Soaring, O thou my grave . . . . ' This wonderful song has been transcribed for concert audiences by the great pianist / composer Franz Liszt, as have numerous other Schumann pieces. In this recording of Widmung, Mr Hall reveals his own identification with the composer's melancholy soul, and hence, the execution is expressed in 'slower motion' than would normally be the case for a live concert engagement. Mr. Hall has wisely perhaps, made the decision to avoid a display of pianistic virtuosity, siding with the suffering soul (versus showing-off with Olympics-styled keyboard gymnastics on display), in keeping with the intent of the song's origin. Those who have heard Mr. Hall's public performances, however, will recall his faster tempos at live concert engagments, which always evokes a great burst of wild applause from the listening audience. The intent here, however, by pianist Hall, is to show the melancholy from the inside out, and not the other way around. Again, it reveals the confidence of this artist in knowing his own preferences for treating this work as having come directly from the composer to his wife. We think it lovely as ever, and if you'll just take a deep breath, and relax, all will be well indeed! Bravo, we say, to this performing pianist, Torrey Hall! He seems to be like a fine wine; his playing gets better with the passing years! This album: MEDITATIONS with TORREY HALL, is a MUST GET for the serious classical music lover, and for all who are searching for a place of rest and quiet from the madness and noise of the world. Add this treasure to your own musical collection!

Details

Titel: Meditations with Torrey Hall/ Classics & Hymns for
Releasedatum: 9-8-2011
Label: CD Baby
Media-indeling: CD
UPC: 789577663824
Objectnummer: 157651X