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Live at 171 Cedar

Live at 171 Cedar

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1. The Leitrim Fancy. This set is comprised of three jigs, and was often our opener for 2009 and 2010. The first tune, The Leitrim Fancy, is the jig in The Bothy Band's A Jig and Five Reels that is the finale on their amazing live album. That is such a spectacular set, and this tune is just terrific. It flows so easily and is perfect in it's simplicity. The second tune, Butlers of Glen Avenue, is the exact opposite. It is one of the most complex jigs you are likely to find, with wide ranges and complicated rhythms that turn the measure around. Like most everyone else who knows this tune, we picked this up from Lunasa's Otherworld album. But-at least according to the discussions on thesession.org-they actually misnamed the tune, which is really The Roaring Barmaid. The Tenpenny Bit is a tune that is heard at sessions now and then, but I leaned it when I was a wee lad, playing in the 1st Michigan Colonial Fife and Drum Corps. Flute solo on Tenpenny Bit by Alyssa. 2. Have you ever seen The Glenn Miller Story with Jimmy Stewart as the great big band leader? He spends the whole movie looking for "The Sound". Well, in Celtic Music Society, we found The Sound when we played Miss Monaghan's Reel one day a long time ago... just by coincidence, our bass player, Mariah Essom, accidentally read the part I had written at double speed; and at the same exact moment, our guitarist, Rob Compa, was mad at me and decided that he wasn't going to play the stupid chords I had stupidly written and he was going to play his own part that he was going to make up right then. After two years of me carefully crafting arrangements, this was the first moment of student input in this group, and it was the moment that we found The Sound. Over the course of the next few weeks we all gleefully played around with the arrangement, coming to eventually add a rhythmic "push" in place of repeated notes. This has been the trademark tune of this group ever since. One of my proudest moments was when I was at a session, and the old-timers started playing Monaghan's-our version. Then there's The Wedding Reel. Best. Reel. Ever. Don't know how many times I/we have watched that video from Celtic Connections. Never gets old. Solos on this set by Max and Jayne. 3. Morrison's Jig/The Butterfly. That cool beginning where it sounds like everything is complete chaos but then it lines up and snaps into place exactly when the tune begins? Yeah, um, we didn't mean to do that. 4. Both Sides the Tweed. Originally inspired by Mary Black's version of Dick Gaughan's great song... we first performed this at Spot Coffee in Rochester on a night when it snowed about two feet. It's the first time Max ever played guitar with this group, as he had always played mandolin only... but on that night we performed it with Nina Quintero on vocals and Peri harmonizing and Max inadvertently played the part as 6/8 instead of 3/4. It worked so amazingly well that it turned into one of the highlights on The Devils of Dublin album later that year. When Caitlin Kenyon joined Celtic just days before our gig at 171 Cedar, it made perfect sense to pull out this great song, and it is a highlight of this album as well. 5. The Drunken Piper. Three great reels: The Drunken Piper, a terrific Scottish tune I again picked up in 1MFDC; Father Kelley's Reel; and everybody's favorite E dorian barnburner, Drowsy Maggie. Another proud moment was having Ted McGraw relate the story of the late Father Kelley smiling as he told him of our student musicians playing his tune. 6. For several years our March Kaleidscope Concert became a theme- or world music concert. First was the all-Mozart concert (for his 250th birthday), then came Music of the Civil War (with our friends from the Excelsior Brigade), then came music of Africa, then Latin Music. I was just about out of energy for all of the arranging, etc. At the start of the 2009-10 school year, so I convinced my esteemed colleague John Polvino that we should have do one more: an Irish music concert on St. Patrick's Day. Just a week or so before the concert, he suggested that we have Celtic accompany one of his most outstanding vocalists on a song she had chosen, Carrick Fergus. The rest, as they say, is history. Caitlin's impact on this group has been profound, and her talent and drive to learn new songs essentially changed this group from an instrumental/dance music group to one that is well-rounded and greatly built on song. And Carrick Fergus just sounds fantastic. Album trivia: The digital tape actually ran out as we held the last note at the concert. Justin (who mixed the album) replicated the last note several times over to make it long enough and took applause from another track. 7. Jayne and Bram: The Big John McNeill Set. Ever read/seen Harry Potter when they say to Hermione "You really are the brightest witch of your age"? I often think of that line when I think of Jayne. No, she's not a witch. But she really is the brightest fiddler of her age. And it really shows in this solo set, in which she shows technique and speed and chops, but also subtlety and maturity and musicianship. And Jayne's brother Bram-well, you'd be impressed to hear any bodhran player play like this. But he's seven. 8. The Balquidder Lasses/Hey! Johnny Cope/Sleepy Maggie. Balquidder is another tune learned from fife and drum; Hey! Johnny Cope is a fantastic Scottish song of victory over the English and Hanoverians; and Sleepy Maggie (not to be confused with Drowsy Maggie) is really, really fast. Alyssa does a great job on the flute solo in Balquidder; we were going for a more modern feel on that tune, and I'm pretty sure Jay-Z is going to cameo on the remix. Vocals on Johnny Cope by Caitlin. More on Johnny Cope: As the Jacobite army advanced south in 1745, a Hanoverian force, led by Sir John Cope, was in pursuit. Bonnie Prince Charlie reached Edinburgh first, however, and Cope assembled his troops to the south, at Prestonpans, waiting for reinforcements. But the wily Jacobite commander Lord George Murray circled round and launched a surprise attack early one morning and routed the government forces, some say in less than 15 minutes. This Jacobite song recalls this famous victory: Cope sent a challenge frae Dunbar: 'Charlie, meet me an' ye daur, An' I'll learn you the art o' war If you'll meet me i' the morning.' Chorus Hey, Johnnie Cope, are ye wauking yet? Or are your drums a-beating yet? If ye were wauking I wad wait To gang to the coals i' the morning. When Charlie looked the letter upon He drew his sword the scabbard from: 'Come, follow me, my merry merry men, And we'll meet Johnnie Cope i' the morningl 'Now Johnnie, be as good's your word; Come, let us try both fire and sword; And dinna rin like a frichted bird, That's chased frae it's nest i' the morning.' When Johnnie Cope he heard of this, He thought it wadna be amiss To hae a horse in readiness, To flee awa' i' the morning. Fy now, Johnnie, get up an' rin; The Highland bagpipes mak' a din; It's best to sleep in a hale skin, For 'twill be a bluidy morning. When Johnnie Cope tae Dunbar came, They speired at him, 'Where's a' your men?' 'The deil confound me gin I ken, For I left them a' i' the morning. 'Now Johnnie, troth, ye werena blate To come wi' news o' your ain defeat, And leave your men in sic a strait Sae early in the morning. 'I' faith,' quo' Johnnie, 'I got sic flegs Wi' their claymores an' philabegs; If I face them again, deil break my legs! Sae I wish you a' gude morning'. Meanings of some unusual words: wauking=waking speired=asked blate=shy sic=such flegs=frights philabegs=kilts 9. Do You Love an Apple? The big sing-along! Come on, everybody! This is a fun, huh-larious folk song with Irish and English backgrounds that just about every Irish musician has sung at some point. It was essentially a throw-away-something to fill time at our longer concerts, but it turned into an audience favorite. Unfortunately, there were no microphones to pick up the audience singing, and that essential part was lost. So we recreated it with a cast of thousands, with everything going wrong that could go wrong, and this song that we practiced for 5 minutes before the show took 20 hours to get it on the album. Go ahead, sing along. It's huh-larious. Lead vocals by Caitlin. 10. The Devils of Dublin set was loved enough by the Celtic of 2007-08 that it was the opener and namesake of our studio album. Although it is near the end of this album, this set opened the second half of the concert. You can hear that we're just a bit rusty near the beginning of the set, but we hit our stride at one or two minutes in, and by the time we pass through the Morningstar Reel and break into Star of Munster, it might just be the best thing on the album. Flute solo in Devils and whistle solo in Morningstar by Peri. And I play the most amazing fiddle solo on the album on Star of Munster. No, I'm lying...it's 11-year-old Jayne. 11. Alyssa is terrific in The Parting Glass, our way of-almost-saying "good night". This 6/8 version was inspired by Sinead O' Connor's track on her spectacular Sean Nos Nua album. We first performed this song in a concert with the Amadeus Chorale. 12. Finally, we stop the show with the showstopper, I'll Tell Me Ma and The Silver Spear. I've heard dozens of versions of this, and I don't like anybody singing this better than Peri. Please, feel free to dance or sing along, as my own children do. Vocals on Tell Me Ma & whistle solo on Silver Spear by Peri.

Details

Kunstenaar: Celtic Music Society
Titel: Live at 171 Cedar
Genre: Celtic
Releasedatum: 21-6-2011
Label: CD Baby
Media-indeling: CD
UPC: 884501549028
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